Worship

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Our Christian Values

At St. Mary’s, we know that ‘with God all things are possible’ (Matthew 19:26) and everything we do is underpinned by our three core Christian values of Love, Respect and Forgiveness. 

Our approach to collective worship is based upon Values for Life Christian values of:
Compassion, Courage, Trust, Forgiveness, Friendship, Thankfulness, Wisdom, Peace, Generosity, Creativity, Service, Truthfulness, Respect, Perseverance, Hope, Humility, Justice, Responsibility
Each term we focus on one of the above values which is chosen by the Year 6 children to enable it to reflect our school and its changing dynamic. Through these values, daily acts of collective worship are planned to give everyone a variety of experiences to develop spirituality through reflection, as well as an understanding of Christianity and aspects of other faiths and cultures.

The experiences include involving children in sharing relevant stories from the Bible, images, drama, poetry, prayers, music, audio visual and singing.They enable us to reflect on and respond to things which we, as a school community, believe are important in preparing children to be responsible citizens now and in the future.

Our worship is structured as follows and provides children with the opportunity to worship in different groups and at different times of the day:

Monday – Whole School Worship

Tuesday – Key Stage Worship

Wednesday – Class based Worship

Thursday – Whole School Worship

Friday – Celebration Worship/ End of day reflection and prayer.
Worship is led by Mrs Irvin, class teachers and visiting clergy from St.Mary’s Church.
At important times in the church calendar parents and friends are invited to join us for services in the church or in school.

Worship

Worship Policy

Members of School Council took to the playground at the end of a school day armed with clipboards containing a questionnaire to find out what parents’ and carers’ views are about Religious Education and Worship at St. Mary’s.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA R.E. and Worship Parent Questionnaire feedback

If you would like to download a blank questionnaire to fill in, please do so below as we always value your views and opinions. You can hand it into the office at anytime.

RE and Worship Parent Questionnaire (blank)

Worship during school closure – Summer 2020
To help support learning at home, have a look at these Worship 2 Go sheets below. There are lots of good activities linked to each specific Christian Value. Keep checking back as more will be added throughout the half term.
Worship 2 Go Patience

Worship 2 Go Peace

Worship 2 Go Resilience

Worship 2 Go Humility

Worship 2 Go Generosity

Worship 2 Go Vulnerability

Each half term, we focus on a different Christian Value around school. Take a look below at what our focus is this half term: 

Spring 2020

Our chosen Christian Value for this half term is Peace. Jesus said ‘Blessed are the peacemakers,for they shall be called children of God.’ (Matthew 5:9) Peace-making actions can range from helping to resolve conflict to creating a space of stillness.Peace,in the sense of total well-being,is God’s intention for the whole of creation, and is a promise that awaits ultimate fulfilment.  

Some questions to consider:
– How can we help each other to live in peace?
– How can we develop our skills as peacemakers?
– What can we do to resolve conflict?
– What do we mean by ‘ Peace with God’ and ‘the peace of God’?

Some Bible stories that illustrate this value are:
– The Message of Isaiah  (Isaiah 2,3,11)
– The Promised King  (Isaiah 9, Micah 5)
– Mary, Martha and Lazarus  (Luke 10)
– Palm Sunday  (Matthew 21, Mark 11, Luke 19)

Other stories you might want to read with your children are:
The War Game : Michael Foreman
This is Our House : Michael Rosen
War and Pease : Michael Foreman
Peace at Last : Jill Murphy
The Tunnel : Anthony Brown

Stories from Other Religions:
The Bath of the Buddha : From Buddhist Stories
The Hatred that Lead to War : Stories from the Sikh World
Angulimala the Robber : Stories from the Hindu World

 

Autumn 2019

The nature of God, as revealed in the Bible, presents all people with choice. Those whose response is one of respect are acknowledging God’s greatness and involvement in the world.  Through worship we will be considering respect for creation, each other and ourselves, including humanity in the image of God.

Some questions to consider:
-How do we all show respect for each other in the school and wider community?
-How are children and others encouraged to respect their own and the belongings of others?
-What special words, sacramental actions or religious symbols are used to challenge and inform an understanding of God?
-How do we create opportunities to experience feelings of awe, wonder and mystery?

Some Bible stories that illustrate this value are:
– Mysterious visitors – Genesis 18
– The Ten Commandments – Exodus 20
-God’s Temple – 1 Kings 5-8
-The Lost Boy – Luke 2
-Zaccheus the Tax Collector – Luke 19

Other stories you might want to read to your children are:
– Aesop’s Fables – Kingfisher Publications
– Lion Storyteller Bedtime Stories – Bob Hardman
– A Tapestry of Tales – Palmer & Breuilly
– The Last Wolf – Michael Morpurgo
– Dogger – Shirley Hughes

Stories from Other Religions:
– The Night of the Journey – A Ganeri Islamic Stories
– The God and the Wicked Witch – A Ganeri Buddhist Stories
– The Lady of Ten Thousand Names – Burleigh Muten
– The Story of Hanukah

Summer 2019
The Christian Value we will be focusing on this half term is Truthfulness. Christians believe that truth is revealed in the Bible and supremely in the person and life of Jesus Christ. Through Jesus’ teaching we are given an insight into the nature of God and the way in which He means us to live.

Some questions to consider:

– How are we truthful in our dealings with one another?

– Do we understand that life is about a search for truth and meaning?

– Do we understand the concept of being true to ourselves and standing up for our own beliefs?

Some Bible stories that illustrate this value are:

– The Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)

– The Two Builders (Matthew 7, Luke 6)

– A Hard Question (Luke 20)

– The Night Visitor (John 3)

Other stories you might want to read with your children are:
– Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
– The Boy who cried Wolf by Bob Hartman
– Spilled Water by Sally Grindley
– Who made me? by Shirley Tulloch

Spring 2019
For Spring 2, we are focusing on Creation and Creativity. Seen from a Christian perspective, all of life is a ‘gift’, entrusted by a loving creator, God, to humankind for a purpose. This purpose is glimpsed as the creative spirit within each person learns to value and explore, celebrate and enjoy this world in all its mystery and diversity. With this gift comes a mutual responsibility to ensure the creation is not spoiled, but rather sustained and shared by all.

Some questions we will consider are:
– How do the various areas of the curriculum promote creativity and enjoyment?
– How do we exercise responsibility towards their environment?
– How do we experience and express feelings of awe and wonder at the beauty, power and mystery of God’s worlds?

Some Bible stories that illustrate this value are:
– The Garden of Eden (Genesis 18)
– A Flood and a Rainbow (Genesis 6-9)
– The Wonders of Creation (Psalm 8)
– Creation is spoiled (Genesis 3)

Other stories you might want to read at home with your children include:
– Five Little Friends by Sarah Dyer
– One World by Michael Foreman
– Wonderful Earth by N Butterworth
– Let’s Take Care of the Earth by R.L Williams
– Lucy’s Picture by Nicola Moon

We are focusing on the Worship Value of Thankfulness this half term. Christians believe that God loves and cares for them in many different ways in all aspects of life. They know that their response to this provision is thankfulness and praise.

Some questions we will consider as a school community are:
– How do we show that we are thankful to the people around us?
– How do we raise consciousness of being thankful for the things we often take for granted?
– How do we show gratitude in practical ways?
– How do we give thanks for new members of our school community?

Some Bible stories we will read as part of our Worship include:
– The Man who Came Back (Luke 17)
– The Two Sons (Genesis 21)
– A Gift of Perfume (Luke 7)

Other stories you might wish to read with your children at home which illustrate the value of Thankfulness are:
– Jim and the Beanstalk by Raymond Briggs
– Daddy’s Lullaby by Tony Bradman
– The Feather by Cleeve and Harley
– Window by Jeannie Baker
– The Generous Rabbit by Bob Hartman
– The Spaghetti Tangle by A McCall Smith

Orange Class performed their class worship to the school on Thursday 7th February around the theme of Thankfulness. We talked about what thankfulness means to us and retold the story of Noah’s Ark because we decided we are very thankful for everything God created. The children acted out the story then showed pictures of what they were thankful for. These can be seen in a book on the Year 1 worship table. We said a prayer and sang our I sing Pop song- Friends for life.

Autumn 2018
This half term, our Christian Worship value is Compassion. Christians believe that their attitudes and actions must reflect the kindness, mercy and compassion of Jesus and the love of God for everyone.

On the run up to Christmas we linked up with The Children’s Society to learn about and make Christingles. We asked the children for donations in exchange they made a Christingle. We welcomed Mr Davies from The Children’s Society who led a whole school worship about the history of the Christingle. We now know what each part of the Christingle represents. Rev Helen Scanlon also led a worship the following week where we recapped our learning whilst Mrs Irvin dressed as a Christingle!





Some questions we will consider during our Worship are:
How do we show kindness and respect to one another?
What links with charities do we have?
How are new members of our school community nurtured and supported in their first term?
How do we emphasise with members of our community who have suffered traumatic experiences?

Bible stories relevant to this value include:
Baby in the Bulrushes (Exodus 1,2)
David Spares Saul (1 Samuel 23,24)
The Good Samaritan (Luke 10)
The Lost Sheep (Luke 15)
The Loving Husband (Hosea)

You may want to explore some of these other stories with your children which illustrate compassion:
Not Now Bernard by David McKee
Refugee Boy by B Zephaniah
The Iron Man by Ted Hughes
The Love-Me Bird by Joyce Dunbar
The Happy Prince by Oscar Wilde

Summer 2
This half term, our Christian Worship focus is Respect. The nature of God, as revealed in the Bible, pre. Those whose response is one of respect are acknowledging God’s greatness, authority and involvement in the world. This will extend to respect for the created order, including humanity made in the image of God.

Some questions we will consider are:
How do we show respect for one another in our school community?
How do we value and respect our own and other people’s belongings?
How do policies and practices in the school engender respect for all members of the school community?

Bible stories that illustrate the value of Respect are:
The Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)
The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20)
Thrown to the Lions (Daniel 6)
Zaccheus the Tax Collector (Luke 19)

Other books you could read at home with your children include:
Singing for Mrs Pettigrew by Michael Morpurgo
Circle of Days by Reeve Lindbergh
Flop-ear and his friends by Guido Van Genechten

It was Yellow Classes turn to run the whole school worship this morning. They chose, alongside Mrs Moran, to tell the school all about their RE topic climate change. They fluently and expertly told the school about how the planet is changing. They stood up confidently and said how we are affecting the planet we live on and asked the rest of the school to make promises of how they can help by making small changes. For example, Jackson said he’d stop using his xbox for an hour and Xhesika said she will try to walk more to school. How can you help?
Mrs Moran and Mrs Warburton were very proud of Yellow Class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer 1
Christian Aid Week

Yellow class have been finding out all about climate change and the way it can affect our planet and some of the poorest people. They have been sharing what they have learnt with the whole school leading a worship assembly. They have asked the whole school to consider their green footprint. They also thanked the school for supporting their cake sale. Yellow class parents and children donated cakes which were sold during break. They managed to raise a magnificent £70.60. Thank you to all families for supporting our charity work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This half term, our Worship value is COURAGE. Basic to Christian faith is the claim that God is always present in every situation. This belief has led to great acts of courage that have included facing danger and opposition, overcoming fear, making a stand for what is right and encouraging others to persevere. Through prayer, people have found the strength to help them to be courageous.

Some questions we will consider are:

  • How can we help members of our school community who are facing difficult times?
  • How do we encourage others to share their fears and worries?
  • How do we show courage and how can we encourage others to be courageous and brave when they are faced with something difficult?

Bible stories that represent this value are:

  • A Miraculous Crossing (Exodus 14,15)
  • Moses and the Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)
  • Two Brave Women (Judges 4,5)
  • A Test of Courage (Esther 2-9)
  • Escape! (1 Samuel 18,19)

Other stories you may wish to explore with your child that have a theme around Courage are:

    • The Huge Bag of Worries by Virginia Ironside
    • Jack’s Big Race by Michael Foreman
    • The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Tomlinson
    • The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
    • Ringo the Flamingo by Neil Griffiths
    • Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
    • Kit’s Wilderness by David Almond

Courage was our Christian Value this half term and Blue Class planned and presented an assembly to the rest of the school. It is always very special when the children present an assembly in this way, as they take responsibility for planning and delivering each section themselves. The children decided on ‘I believe I can fly’ as the song being played as children walked into the hall, giving the message that if we believe we can, we can do anything if we have the courage to do so!

We explained that the focus on the assembly was having the courage to do the right thing and began with a short role-play where a group of children were acting being mean to someone and one person had the courage to stand up to them and make sure that person was ok. We then related this to a story from the Bible, and acted out a story of Peter and John standing up for what is right. Following on from this, we asked our audience some questions related to the story, such as ‘Do you think Peter and John did the right thing by standing up for what they believe in?’ and ‘When is it right to refuse to do what other people tell you?’

Next, we shared some facts about three people we had researched during one of our PSHE lessons who had the courage to stand up for what they believe in – Harriet Tubman, Ernest Shackleton and George Muller. We then shared some courage rosettes we had made and some children explained who they were awarding their rosette to and why. We concluded our assembly with a Courage acrostic poem where a child each held a different line of the poem:
Carrying on when things are difficult
Overcoming fear
Understanding and facing a challenge
Risking being out of your comfort zone
Always believing in God’s promises
Going for a goal                                                                                   

Empowered by encouragement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2

Our Worship value this half term is FORGIVENESS. Forgiveness is the means by which damaged relationships are restored. It is an act of the will, motivated by love. For Christians, Jesus’ death on a cross is the ultimate revelation of God’s all forgiving love, and his sacrifice stands as a source of inspiration to forgive others, no matter what the cost.

Some questions we will consider are:

  • How can we help each other to acknowledge that we all make mistakes and all need forgiveness from God and from each other from time to time?
  • How do we help each other to make amends for our mistakes?
  • How does our school foster the idea that forgiveness and acceptance of all builds the life of our school community?

Some bible stories we may look at to help us discuss this value are:

  • The Story of the Lost Sheep (Luke 7)
  • A Gift of Perfume (Luke 7)
  • The New Life (Colossians 3)

Other stories that may illustrate Forgiveness are:

  • Lucy’s Quarrel by Jennifer Northway
  • The Trouble with Jack by Shirley Hughes
  • I Forgot to Say I Love You by Miriam Moss
  • I’m Sorry by Sam McBratney
  • Little Monster Did It by Helen Cooper

Spring 1

This half term we will focusing on the Christian perspective on TRUST. Trust is the basis of all stable relationships, including a person’s relationship with God. God’s commitment to humanity is seen in his willingness
to trust ordinary people with the carrying out of his purposes through history.

Some questions we will consider are:

  • What does it mean to have trust in others?
  • What are the repercussions when trust is broken?
  • Which role models can we think of that show different types of trust that work in our school community and in the wider world?

Bible stories that illustrate Trust are:

  • A Journey into Fear (Genesis 31,32)     
  • The Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)
  • Elijah and the Prophet (1 Kings 17)
  • Naaman and the Little Servant Girl (2 Kings 5)
  • The Promised King (Isaiah 9, Micah 5)

Other stories you might want to share with your children that portray Trust are:

  • Can’t You Sleep Little Bear by Martin Waddell and B. Firth
  • Owl Babies by Martin Waddell
  • Jim’s Lion by Russel Hoban
  • Badger’s Parting Gift by Susan Varley
  • Dinosaurs and all that Rubbish by Michael Foreman
  • Always and Forever by Alan Durant and D. Gilari
  • Goodnight Mr. Tom by Michelle Magorian
  • The Boy who cried Wolf (Aesop’s Fable)

 Autumn 2 2017

This half term we will be thinking about the Christian perspective on GENEROSITY. God’s generosity is best described as ‘grace’, love given freely without limit or conditions. This generosity, once experienced and acknowledged by an individual, can in turn release a generous spirit towards others.

Some questions we will consider through our school worship:
Do we truly understand the concept of giving without seeking any reward?
How do we act with generosity in both our words and actions?
Which areas of the curriculum enable us to consider the importance of being generous not only with material objects but also with time, spirit and talents?

Some bible stories that illustrate this value are:
God’s Promise to Abraham (Genesis 13-15)
The two Sons (Genesis 21)
David’s Kindness (2 Samuel 9)
The Wonders of Creation (Psalm 8)
Wise Men visit Jesus (Matthew 2)
The Lost Sheep (Luke 15)
Loaves and Fishes (Matthew 14)
A Miracle at the Temple Gate (Acts 3, 4)

Below are some other stories you might want to read at home with your child that illustrates generosity:
One Winter’s Day by Christine Butler
The Smartest Giant in Town by Julia Donaldson
Sharing a Shell by Julia Donaldson
The Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister
The Tiger who came to Tea by Judith Kerr
The Greatest Gift by Susan Summers

Autumn 1 2017

This term we will be thinking about the Christian perspective on JUSTICE. The justice revealed in the Bible is always seen in the context of love. It includes the call to take responsibility for one another, especially the poor and oppressed, and to see that no-one is excluded from the essentials of life.

Some questions we will consider through school reflection and worship:
How does our school make children aware of global justice issues?
How does our school support charities?
What strategies are in place to ensure that rules and procedures in the school are fair and just?
How do we encourage pupils to take responsibility for each other in the school community and to develop a sense of responsibility towards their ‘neighbours’ near and far?
how does our school ensure that it is an inclusive community for all?
how does the school demonstrate compassion and help for those who have made mistakes?

Some Bible stories that will help us understand justice are:
Moses and Pharoah (Exodus 4-6)
The True Mother (1 Kings 3)
Belshazzar’s Feast (Daniel 5)
A Rich Young Man (Matthew 19)
A House of Prayer (Matthew 21)
Other stories that you may wish to read at home with you child are:
Mole and the Baby Bird (Marjorie Newman)
Selfish Giant by Oscar Wilde (Fiona Waters)
This Is Our House (Michael Rosen)
From Slave Ship to Freedom Road (J Lester, R Brown)
From When The World Began (Elizabeth Laird)

Further learning about Justice:

Personal justice – ‘playing fair’ with others; respecting others’ rights; acting responsibly and fairly with the people we meet each day.

Social justice – speaking up on behalf of others in the community; recognising that others are fellow human beings with the same rights as ourselves; making sure all voices are heard impartially; challenging biased reporting, unfair practices and institutional prejudice; working for a fairer society.

Global justice – honouring human rights for all people; campaigning for a fairer world; challenging unfair systems of trade and exposing financial exploitation; speaking up for the poor, the marginalised and the vulnerable; giving a fair hearing to migrant workers, refugees, the forgotten poor and the powerless; speaking up against global inequality; reassessing our own experiences of justice in the light of global issues

 Key Bible verse: Micah 6:8 (CEV):
‘The Lord God has told us what is right and what he demands: “See that justice is done; let mercy be your first concern, and humbly obey your God.”‘
Many of the prophets in the Old Testament spoke out against corruption and injustice in the society of their day, because this is something that God hates. The way we treat each other is seen by Christians as a true mark of their commitment to God.

Key concepts to unpack:
Fair play is a very strong instinct in most of us. We tend to become upset when things aren’t fair and we or others get a raw deal.
Justice is obtained in most democratic societies through a system of laws, which are there to make sure that people are not hurt or exploited by others. These laws are made by people to protect them from their own worst behaviour. However, sometimes these very laws are shown to be unfair and they need to be challenged and changed.

A simple ‘rule of thumb’ on what is just behaviour is provided by the so-called ‘golden rule’, taken from Jesus’ words in the Sermon on the Mount:
‘Treat others as you want them to treat you’ (Matthew 7:12).
However, this verse must be put in its wider context. Jesus calls his followers to see justice, not as a way of getting revenge and paying people back; instead, he calls them to forgive their enemies, go the extra mile and not judge other people.
Working for justice for various groups and causes brings people together to form pressure groups that aim to change things for the better.
Christians are involved, for example, in campaigns to change rules on unfair trading; promote ethical conditions for the workers around the world, and they support the buying and selling of fairly traded goods as a way of acting on behalf of the poor.
The first of 30 wise sayings from Proverbs (22:22-23) is:
‘Don’t take advantage of the poor or cheat them in court. The Lord is their defender.’
And David exclaims in Psalm 41:1:
‘You, Lord God, bless everyone who cares for the poor.’
Children encounter issues of justice when:
they are involved in solving classroom disputes and personal rivalries
they experience the rules of a school
they help establish golden rules for the classroom, playground or dinner hall
they buy fairly traded goods or ethical clothing
they hear stories that explore global inequalities
they become arbiters for others in disputes
they hear about inequality and unfairness on the TV or via the Internet

 

Summer  2016

To start the new academic year, we will be thinking about the Christian Value WISDOM. Christians believe that true wisdom comes from God. As a believer grows in faith so wisdom will increase. In the Bible wisdom is seen both as a gift from God and a characteristic of God. In his parables Jesus taught that placing trust in God and recognising what is of value in life brings fulfilment.

Some questions we will be considering:

  • How are pupils encouraged to act responsibly and think about the wisdom of their words and actions?
  • Are school members actively praised for making sensible and wise choices.
  • Which areas of the curriculum enable the children to consider the importance of thoughtfulness and wisdom?
  • How can children be helped to appreciate the wisdom of others?
  • How are children helped to understand the difference between being clever and being wise?
  • Do children encounter words of wisdom from many different sources?
  • How are children taught to respect the wisdom of parents and teachers?
  • How are adults in the school helped to recognise the spiritual wisdom of the pupils?
  • How do you encourage pupils to reflect on what is of real  value in life?

Some Bible stories that demonstrate wisdom:

  • Living God’s Way (Psalm 119)
  • A Wise New Ruler  (1 Kings 2,3)
  • The True Mother (1 Kings 3)
  • The Worst Advice (1 Kings 12)
  • The Lost Boy (Luke 2)
  • A Rich Young Man (Matthew 19)
  • The Unknown God (Acts 17)

Books you may wish to read at home with your child:

  • The fish who could wish (John Bush)
  • The shore beyond (Mary Joslim)
  • Goose in a Hole (Judith Kerr)
  • The Wise Doll (Hiawyn Oram)
  • Daft Bat (Jeane Willis)

Spring  2016

This half term we will be looking at the Christian value RESPECT. The nature of God, as revealed in the Bible, presents all people with a choice. Those whose response is one of respect are acknowledging God’s greatness, authority and involvement in the world. This will extend to respect for the created order, including humanity made in the image of God. Reverence takes this response a step further and will include aspects of worship such as awe and wonder, surrender and sacrifice.

Some questions we will consider during worship are:

  • How are pupils given the opportunity in school to experience feelings of awe, wonder and mystery?
  • Are there places and objects around the school that are considered ‘Holy or sacred’, which help children reflect and wonder at the nature of God?
  • What special words, sacramental  actions or religious symbols are used to challenge and inform children’s understanding of God?
  • How do children show their respect for each other and adults in the school community?
  • How are children encouraged to value and respect their own and other people’s belongings?
  • How do policies and practices in the school engender respect for all members of the school community?

Some Bible stories that demonstrate respect:

  • Mysterious Visitors (Genesis 18)
  • The Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)
  • The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20)
  • A Place for Worship (Exodus 35-40)
  • Moses  sees the Promised Land (Numbers 20)

Other books you may wish to read at home:

  • Circle of days (Reeve Lindbergh)
  • Singing for Mrs Pettigrew (Michael Morpurgo)
  • Values for thinking (Robert Fisher)

 

Autumn  2016

Our new Christian Value is RESPONSIBILITY. The Bible teaches that life is a gift from God and it is our responsibility to use our talents and abilities in the best way we can.

Some questions that we will consider during worship are:

  • How are pupils encouraged to act responsibly in the classroom?
  • Is there a whole school policy regarding responsibility for the environment?
  • How much responsibility is the school council given to implement the decisions it makes?
  • Are pupils encouraged to think about where responsibility lies for ethical issues that they encounter?
  • Do pupils understand that attainment in classroom tasks lies not only with the teacher but also with the individual?

Some bible stories that demonstrate responsibility:

  • Creation is Spoiled (Genesis 3)
  • The Burning Bush (Exodus 2-4)
  • The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20)
  • Ruth and Naomi (Ruth 1)
  • David’s Kindness (2 Samuel 9)
  • The True Mother (1 Kings 3)
  • The Reluctant Prophet (Jeremiah 1-40, 52)

Other stories you may wish to share with your child are:

  • The boy who cried wolf (Bob Hartman)
  • Brave Charlotte (Anu Stohner)
  • Giraffes Can’t Dance (Giles Andeae)
  • The Vicar of Nibbleswick (Roald Dahl)
  • Singing for Mrs Pettigrew (Michael Morgurgo)
  • The Magic Paintbrush (Julia Donaldson)

 

Spring 1 2016

Our new Christian Value is Generosity. God’s generosity is best described as ‘grace’, love given freely without limit or conditions. This generosity, once experienced and acknowledged by an individual, can in turn release a generous spirit towards others.

Some questions we will consider throughout our Worship include:

  • Do pupils truly understand the concept of giving without seeking any reward?
  • How are pupils encouraged to act with generosity in both their words and their actions?
  • Which areas of the curriculum enable the children to consider the importance of being generous not only with material objects but also with time, spirit and talents?

Some stories that we will read during worship to illustrate generosity include:

  • God’s Promise to Abraham (Genesis 13-15)
  • The two Sons (Genesis 21)
  • David’s Kindness ( 2 Samuel 9)
  • The Promised King (Isaiah 9, Micah 5)
  • The Lost Sheep (Luke 15)
  • Loaves and Fishes (Matthew 14)
  • Kind Dorcas (Acts 9)

Other bible stories that you may wish to read at home with your child are:

  • Food from Heaven (Exodus 15-17)
  • The Wonders of Creation (Psalm 8)
  • A Widow and her Son (1 Kings 17)
  • Wise Men visit Jesus ( Matthew 2)
  • Jesus heals a Leper ( Luke 5)
  • The Gift of Perfume ( Luke 7)

Autumn 2 2015

Our most recent Christian Value is Hope. Christians see their hope in God’s promise ‘that love and goodness have, and will ultimately, overcome all evil’. This hope is manifested in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Some questions we will consider throughout our Worships include:

  • Which visions do we have of a hopeful future?
  • How can we understand that there is a chance of a new beginning and a fresh start in every situation?
  • As citizens of the world, which challenges and responsibilities are we faced with?

Some of the stories we will  read during our Worships that portray Hope include:

  • The Story of Simeon (Luke 2)
  • A Special Promise (Genesis 6-9)
  • I Wish Tonight by Lois Rock
  • Story of the Toy Box Charity

Other stories you might want to explore with your child are:

  • Gabriel Visits Mary (Luke 1)
  • Palm Sunday (Matthew 21)
  • The Empty Tomb (John 20)
  • The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle
  • The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Tomlinson
  • Jasper’s Beanstalk by N. Butterworth
  • Goodnight Mr Tom by M. Magorian

Remembrance Day

On Wednesday 11th November Yellow class walked to the local Cenotaph in Reddish. We remembered all the heroes who lost their lives in the war. We held a two minute silence at 11am and prayed for all the people who had fallen.

 

Mr Beckingham visit!

On Thursday 10th December, Mr Beckingham came to visit school once again. He talked to us about the true meaning of Christmas with the birth of Jesus Christ. He performed some impressive magic tricks to make us think about what happens when people take Christ out of Christmas! We really enjoyed the special worship time.

 

 

Autumn 1 2015

This half term, our Christian Value is Thankfulness. Christians believe that God loves and cares for them in many different ways in all aspects of their life. They know that their response to this provision should be one of thankfulness and praise.

Some questions we will consider throughout our Worships include:

  • How do we show an appreciative and thankful attitude to all members of our school community?
  • How do we give thanks to new members of our school community?
  • How can we show thanks for many things that we often take for granted?
  • How do we show our gratitude in practical ways?

Some of the bible stories we will look at that portray thankfulness, include:

  • The Man Who Came Back! (Luke 17)
  • A Gift of Perfume (Luke 7)
  • Time to Get Up (Matthew 0)
  • The Two Sons (Genesis 21)
  • The First Christmas
  • Psalm 8
  • Psalm 148

Other stories you might want to explore with your children are:

  • Grandad’s Prayer of the Earth by Douglas Wood
  • The Generous Rabbit by Bob Hartman
  • Daddy’s Lullaby by Tony Bradman
  • The Feather by Cleeve and Harley
  • All the Tales from the Ark by Avril Rowlands
  • Window by Jeannie Baker

On the last day of half term, Green Class led our whole-school Worship in the hall. They planned the whole Worship based around the theme of Thankfulness and decided that they would go with the theme ‘Remembering to say Thank You’. They told and acted out the story of ‘Jesus heals the 10 lepers’, where only one leper remembered to go back and thank Jesus. They explained that we have lots of people in our lives we need to thank, and read some poems they had written thanking the people in the St. Mary’s community for all the things they do for us. They then asked us to remember to thank God for all the wonderful things in our lives by joining in with a prayer. We sang the hymn ‘Thank You Lord’ and they ended their assembly by asking us to remember to thank our friends each day and asking us to join in with the song ‘Friends for Life’. Well done Green Class, this was a very thoughtful Worship!